Abstract



COMPARISON OF BACKGROUND RATES FOR TRICHOMONAS VAGINALIS AND MYCOPLASMA GENITALIUM WITH CLINICAL DIAGNOSES

James Woodward - jdw1u18@soton.ac.uk

Megan Dalrymple-Hay - mdh1g18@soton.ac.uk

Pareya Ahmad - pa5g17@soton.ac.uk

Anisa Bangura - aab2g18@soton.ac.uk

Raj Patel - prj467@gmail.com

James Woodward - University Of Southampton

Megan Dalrymple-Hay - University Of Southampton

Pareya Ahmad - University Of Southampton

Anisa Bangura - University Of Southampton

Raj Patel - University Of Southampton/Solent Sexual Health

Objective: Routine testing for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) using NAATs is now accepted as a routine practice across most of Europe. Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) testing is more controversial and many units adopt a more cautious approach. Analysis of non-requested anonymised results gathered by the Abbot Alinity-m multiplex assay over an extended period will provide background rates of TV and MG in all patients attending a Level 3 inner-city sexual health service allowing comparison against clinical diagnosis to determine the proportion of undiagnosed cases.

Methods: All patients having a genital or extragenital CT/NG tests had samples taken using the Alinity-m collection system. These samples were processed within 24hrs on the Alinity-m platform.  The multiplex system routinely tests in real-time for all pathogens the assay is capable of but only provides results linked to a patient ID for the specific pathogen assays requested initially. Results gathered for pathogens that have not been requested are recorded anonymously and can be extracted. The rates for TV treatment during this time were also collated (based on microscopic examination of wet film preparations).

Results: Over the first 5 months the program to May 2020 a total of 3015 samples had CT/NG requested. Across these samples 179 tested positive for MG, 151 tested positive for CT, 115 tested positive for NG and 45 tested positive for TV and on the multiplex assay. In this time 4 patients were treated for TV from clinical evaluation and microscopy.

Conclusion:  The most frequent pathogen identified in the unit is MG (being commoner then CT).  Only 8.8% of TV was diagnosed by microscopy. The Alinity-m system allows for the selective requesting of TV and MG on genital specimens and the unit plans to include TV (for all cases of vaginal discharge and some patients at high risk of infection) and to extend MG testing to all cases of men presenting with urethral or testicular symptoms, women with abdominal pain,  abnormal vaginal bleeding and vaginal discharge symptoms.


52|jwoodward264@gmail.com|
34 IUSTI Congress - European Congres on Sexually transmitted Infections and HIV/AIDS
TAMING THE TIDE of STIs & HIV
Bucharest, September 3-5,